Rising Damp
Rising Damp

Damp Control Solutions

Penetrating Dampness

Salt Damp

Rising Dampess

 

Damp Proofing Solutions for Rising Damp

What is Rising Damp?

 

Rising damp occurs when moisture from the ground is "sucked" into porous building materials from which walls are constructed. It does this through a process called "Capillarity".

 

What are the symptoms of Rising Dampness?

 

Rising Dampness can cause:

 

  • Decorative Spoiling - Peeling wall paper, blistering paint and deteriorated plasterwork.

 

  • Salt Damage/Patches - Hygroscopic Salts can cause a wall to remain damp even when a new damp proof course has been installed.

 

  • Erosion of the Building Fabric - Spalling brickwork, crystallising salts damaging mortar, brick and stonework.

 

  • Increased Heat Loss - Dampness in porous building materials such as damp walls causes a reduction of insulation properties. Heat loss caused by rising dampness lowers the surface temperature of walls increasing the chances of condensation settling on the surface.

 

  • Timbers in close contact with areas which are damp can also be subject to fungal decay and attack by woodboring insects (Woodworm).

 

Does the plasterwork on the wall affected need to be removed?

 

When rising damp occurs in a wall it can carry salts into the wall fabric/plasterwork as the moisture evaporates at the wall surface. Two salts which are common with rising damp are chlorides and nitrates (Hygroscopic Salts). These salts are capable of attracting and absorbing moisture from the atmosphere when the relative humidity is high. This means that even if a damp-proof course is successfully installed the plaster may remain damp.

 

It is for this reason that wall plaster affected by rising damp should normally renewed in conjunction with the installation of a new damp proof course. Re-plastering should always be carried out to a minimum height of 1 metre.

Rising Damp Treatments Can Involve:

Removal of Contaminated Plaster and Damp Proof Course Injection

 

Rising damp treatments may require the removal of salt contaminated plaster to the affected areas in accordance with British Standard 6576:2005.

 

A new damp proof course can be injected using Dryzone or Dyrods.

 

  • Dryzone is a silane/siloxane cream emulsion that reacts with moisture to form a highly effective hydrophobic barrier against rising damp in masonry structures.

 

  • Dryrods are made from fibre rods and are a new high performance damp proof course material. Dryrods are an alternative to Dryzone cream and are suitable for situations that require maximum perforamce, such as highly saturated walls.

 

Once a damp proof course has been inserted, the moisture in the wall from the previous rising damp will start to dry out. As a general guide, the drying rate is given as 1 month for every 25mm of wall thickness (BRE Digest 163). This means a 230mm wall will take approximately 9 months to dry.

 

It is important therefore that the walls are allowed to "breathe" and wallpaper or other barriers to evaporation are not applied until the walls are dry.

 

Floor/wall junctions (solid concrete floors) may need to be sealed with Drybase liquid applied damp proof membrane.

 

Re-Plastering Methods

 

A number of methods are available for re-plastering following the insertion of a damp proof course. A survey of your property will help decide which method is most suitable.

 

A few examples are:

 

  • Walls can be sealed with tanking slurries. This method is often used when some areas of the wall are below ground level. A render and a plaster skim finish are then usually applied on top.

 

  • Plastic Polypropylene Membranes (Plaster Membranes AKA CDM) or Drybase Flex Membrane are a useful way of isolating plasterboards and renders from salt contaminated surfaces. A plaster skim finish is usually applied on top of the plasterboard or render.

 

  • Older buildings may require Lime re-plastering (Dryzone Hi-LIme Plaster).

 

  • Tradtional render systems - Dryzone Damp Resistant Plaster is applied as the base coat. This is a breathable plaster but will not allow the passage of salts through to the surface. It has excellent thermal qualities. A finish coat of Thistle Multi Finish is then applied.

 

 Please note the above is a guide only and does not apply to every job undertaken.

A Company with Over 200 Genuine Reviews

Trusted Trader Checked Reviews

Before you book a survey with us, you may want to read some of our impressive reviews. We have built up a huge amount of reviews for you to see that we have been offering great service, year after year.

Accreditations

 

Get in Touch

You can contact us by calling 0115 9304240 or 01332 960160 or use our contact form.

 

Latest Case Studies

CK Walker Damp & Timbers feature in case study by Safeguard Europe.

 

Read about it here.

Social Media for CK Walker Damp & Timbers

Tweets from dampandtimbers @dampandtimbers
Print Print | Sitemap
CK Walker Damp & Timbers have been providing: Damp Proofing, Condensation Control, Re-Plastering, fungal decay & Woodworm solutions throughout Derbyshire & Nottingham since 1991. CK Walker LTD trading as CK Walker Damp & Timbers – Company Number 9072842 - Registered Office – Old Church Institute, Main Street, Mapperley, Ilkeston, Derbyshire, DE7 6BY All images and text on this website are protected by copyright. 2017 For all your damp proofing & timber treatment needs in Derbyshire & Nottingham, Call us on 01332 960160 or 0115 9304240